Episode #140 Preview: Free-rider Friday - April 2017

The last Friday of every month Ed and Ron will do “Free-Rider Friday.” Most of our shows are “topic” driven, where we dive deep into one subject. Free-Rider Fridays are designed to be “event” driven, whatever issues are in the news that we (or you) find worthy of commentary. In economics, free riding means reaping the benefits from the actions of others and consequently refusing to bear the full costs of those actions. This means Ed and Ron will free ride off of the news, and each other, with no advanced knowledge of the events either will bring up. If you’d like to call-in during the live show, the listener line is: 866-472-5790. You can also participate on Twitter at #ASKTSOE, @asktsoe, or email us at asktsoe@verasage.com.

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Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #139: More VeraSage Laws

Our first show on VeraSage Laws, was Episode #53 on July 24, 2015. In that show, we discussed the five VeraSage Laws:

  1. Baker’s Law: Bad customers drive out good customers
  2. Kless’ First Law - He who liveth by the discount, shall ye also perish by the discount.
  3. Kless’ Second Law - All measurements are judgments in disguise.
  4. Baker’s Axiom: Ideas are always and everywhere more important than their execution.
  5. VeraSage adoption of the Second Law of medicine—Prescription before diagnosis is malpractice.

Five More VeraSage Laws

Drucker’s Law of Inversion: Marketing and selling are not complementary, but adversarial. The book by William A. Cohen, A Class with Drucker, Peter Drucker’s first Ph.D. student, is the first place Ron read this thought from Drucker.

William’s Axiom: The default purpose of marketing is not to increase sales, but profits.

Ike’s First Law of Project Management: Plans are worthless, planning is essential.

Bowman’s Law: Hourly billing requires a calculator. Value Pricing requires courage.

Morris’ Postualte: What if Disney entered your industry? 

 

 

 

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Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #139 Preview: More VeraSage Laws

Over the years, many fellows at VeraSage Institute have coined various "laws," such as Baker's Law: Bad customers drive out good customers. In this episode, Ed and Ron will explore more famous, and infamous, VeraSage Laws.

Here is a link to the previous show if you want to listen. 

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Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #138: Das Intellectual Kapital

“The philosophers have only interpreted the world invarious ways. The point however is to change it.” –Inscription on Karl Marx’s tomb

“We were among the last to understand that in the age of information science the most valuable asset is knowledge, springing from human imagination and creativity. We will paying for our mistake for many years to come.” –Mikhail Gorbachev

Intellectual Capital: knowledge that can be converted into profits.

  1. Human (80% of the developed world’s wealth, according to The World Bank)
  2. Structural
  3. Social (relationship)

At the societal level, knowledge can grow even when profits decline.

There’s no such thing as a natural resource—except the mind of man.

According to George Gilder, from his book Knowledge and Power:

  • Wealth = Knowledge
  • Learning = Growth

You could add to the middle of that syllogism: Entrepreneurship = Learning.

The following is an excerpt from Ron Baker’s book, Measure What Matters to Customers: Using Key Predictive Indicators.

Human Capital

In a few hundred years, when the history of our time is written from a long-term perspective, it is likely that the most important event those historians will see is not technology, not the Internet, not e-commerce. It is an unprecedented change in the human condition. For the first time—literally—substantial and rapidly growing numbers of people have choices. For the first time, they will have to manage themselves.

And society is totally unprepared for it. —Peter Drucker, “Managing Knowledge Means Managing Oneself,” 2000

The term human capital was first used by Nobel Prize–winning economist Theodore W. Schultz in a 1961 article in American Economic Review.

Human capital is like the dark matter of the cosmos: we know it’s out there but we can’t measure it. Once again, Peter Drucker was at the forefront of thought when he coined both the terms knowledge society and knowledge worker, in 1961, and later expanded on this new phenomenon in his 1968 book, The Age of Discontinuity.

Today, knowledge workers themselves own the firm’s means of production—in their heads.

Knowledge Workers Are Volunteers

In today’s capitalist society, labor trumps capital as the chief source of all wealth. Your team members don’t just contribute work, but also knowledge to the firm—they are knowledge workers in the purest sense.

Knowledge workers own the means of production.

In a factory, the worker serves the system; in a knowledge environment, the system should serve the worker.

Knowledge work can only be designed by the knowledge worker, not for them. Unlike work on an assembly line, knowledge work is not defined by quantity but by quality.

It is also not defined by its costs, but by its results.

Thinking in terms of human capital investors lends dignity and respect to the value of each person. The word “human” comes from the Latin Hominem, for man, and the word “capital” from the Latin caput, meaning head.

All capital ultimately springs from the mind. In a strict sense, a company’s knowledge is created only by individuals—albeit some are outside of the firm’s employ—and thus no knowledge can be created without people.

Moreover, the average knowledge worker today will outlive his or her employer, with an average productive work life of approximately 50 years, compared to the average organizational life of 30.

This has tilted the balance of power to the knowledge worker, as Drucker pointed out:

In the knowledge society, the most probable assumption for organizations—and certainly the assumption on which they have to conduct their affairs—is that they need knowledge workers far more than knowledge workers need them.

Yet companies do not seem to understand the worth of their people. They treat them as if they were assets—or equally offensive, resources—rather than as investors of human capital who own their own—hence the firm’s—means of production.

And like most investors, they will go where they can earn a fair economic return—measured in wages, fringe benefits, and other pecuniary rewards—as well as where they are well treated and respected, the psychological return.

Labeling your people as assets is demeaning. Stalin used to say the same thing—and acted on it. People deserve more respect than a phone system or computer.

But labeling employees resources—from the Latin resurgere, “to rise again”—is even worse, as if people were oil or timber to be harvested when you run out.

There is a Chinese proverb that teaches the beginning of wisdom is to call things by their right names.

Your people are actually volunteers, since whether or not they return to work on any given day is completely based on their own volition. Consider volunteer. It’s usually based on a desire to contribute to something larger than themselves. They work hard—some would say harder than at their jobs—for these organizations because they are dedicated to the cause and they have the passion, the desire, and the dream to make a difference in the lives of others. All for zero pay. Why?

I am not suggesting freedom for people “to do their own thing”; that is not freedom, it is license. The flip side of freedom is responsibility. Holding people accountable for the results they achieve, hardly a prescription for anarchy and chaos. When leaders feel they need to tightly control a knowledge worker, they have made a hiring mistake.

There is no better way to demoralize knowledge workers than to have them perform duties that interfere with the tasks they are qualified to do. In all probability, the best way to increase the effectiveness of most knowledge workers is by removing various tasks that distract them from their core specializations. We do not want surgeons piercing ears or nurses spending half of their time completing paperwork (a common complaint).

Far Fewer Knowledge Workers Than We Think

Dan Morris has not let me down. He thinks I’m wrong about most professional firms being filled with knowledge workers; he believes the majority of them are more akin to factory workers in the days of Taylor. Now I know this is a heretical view, but Dan has assembled a very powerful argument to support his assertion. He does not deny professionals have the potential to be knowledge workers. His argument is they are not largely because of the incentives and structures of the firms in which they operate, which function more like sweatshops of yore.

Stephen Covey writes about exactly this in his latest book, The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness: “… It’s the leadership beliefs and style of the manager, not the nature of the job or economic era, that defines whether a person is a knowledge worker or not. If he is not perceived as a knowledge worker, that is, if a janitor is not seen as the local expert on janitorial work, then he is a manual worker and not a knowledge worker.”

I do not agree with this definition in its entirety. The major determinant of knowledge workers is that they own the means of production, and they apply knowledge to knowledge to create value. Covey’s requirement of the leadership beliefs and style of management may be necessary conditions, but they are not sufficient, in and of themselves, to define knowledge work.

In the old days, one took their coffee to the office. With Starbucks and knowledge workers, we now take our office to the coffee.

Most professional service firms to measure their team members, they all come from the Industrial Revolution’s command-and-control hierarchies (realization and utilization rates, billable hour quotas, etc).

Dan further supports his argument by stating that leaders of knowledge workers:

  • Don’t impose billable hour quotas.
  • Understand knowledge workers are paid for ideas, not hours, like union employees.
  • Allow at least 15 percent of team member time for innovation and creating better ways to add value to customers. (This certainly destroys productivity under the old metrics.)
  • Understand that judgments and discernment are far more important than measurements in assessing performance.
  • Are focused on outputs, results, and value, not inputs, efforts, activities, and costs.
  • Don’t require timesheets that account for every 10 minutes of their day.
  • Trust their workers to do the right thing for the firm and its customers.
  • Recognize that individuals have value, not jobs.
  • Allow their workers to monetize the value of their output, through stock options or other incentives that share the wealth created by minds, not machines.
  • Conduct AARs and other ways to bank their IC
  • Select workers who are passionate and self-motivated and don’t need constant supervision.

The purchase of Pixar by Disney, on January 24, 2006, for $7.4 billion in Disney stock. Disney will have to respect Pixar’s culture and continue to let it make quality movies at its own pace, in its own way.

Otherwise, if Pixar’s creative talent leaves, “Disney just purchased the most expensive computers ever sold,” according to Lawrence Haverty, a fund manager at Gabelli Asset Management.

It remains to be seen whether Disney can learn from Steve Jobs’ philosophy: “You cannot mandate productivity, you must provide the tools to let people become their best.”

Knowledge workers cannot be told how to do their job, since many understand the job at hand better than their bosses. They cannot be held accountable for results if their methods are micromanaged.

It is obvious executives who are responsible for knowledge workers are going to have to become much more comfortable with intuition, judgment, and discernment over measurements. You simply cannot manage people by numbers.

Knowledge Workers of the World Unite!

It is time for the firms of the future to remove the sword of Damocles—objective measurements hanging over the head of their workers—and unleash them from a theory no longer applicable to the modern intellectual capital economy.

It requires leadership and vision. It requires knowing you are doing the right thing, not just doing things right. It requires focusing the company on the external results it creates for customers and simultaneously building the type of organization people are proud to be a part of and invest their intellectual capital in. It requires an attitude of experimentation, not simply doing things because that is the way it has always been done. It requires less measurement and more trust.

To paraphrase from the last lines in Karl Marx’s The Communist Manifesto: “Knowledge workers of all countries, unite! You have nothing to lose but your timesheets.”

Why Knowledge Grows

We highly recommend the 2015 book by statistical physicist Cesar Hidalgo, Why Information Grows: The Evolution of Order, from Atoms to Economies.

Economists describe the economy by factors of production, such as land, labor, and capital

Natural scientists use: energy, matter, and information. These two visions are not incompatible

Hidalgo writes that information is physical, in that it’s always physically embodied; it’s not a thing; it’s an arrangement of physical things.

He says the act of giving birth is, in essence, time travel: from the ancientness of her mother’s womb (100,000 years ago babies experienced the same environment) to the modernity of 21st century society.

The difference between the worlds not in the physicality of matter but in the way in which matter is arranged.

Hildalgo distinguishes between knowledge and knowhow:

Knowledge involves relationships between entities, which allows us to predict outcomes of events without having to act them out (tobacco use is bad without having to use it ourselves).

Knowhow is the capacity to perform actions, which is tacit (walk, ride a bike, etc.).

Both are highly constrained, as they are each embodied in human beings.

If you crash a car into a wall: the value lost is not in the car’s atoms but in the way they were arranged.

Eating apples: they existed first in the world, then in our heads.

Apple (computers): they existed first in someone’s head, then in the world.

Both embody info, but Apple is crystals of imagination.

Making crystals of imagination requires enormous amount of knowledge and knowhow.

The maximum amount of knowledge and knowhow a human can accumulate Hidalgo’s calls a personbyte.

When products require more personbytes than any one person can possess, teams and organizations are formed, and they’re limited to a firmbyte.

Cesar did an interview with Russ Roberts on EconTalk, which you can listen to here.

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #137: Earning Our Mouse Ears: Disney’s Approach to Customer Loyalty

In September 1997, Ron attended the Disney Institute’s Professional Development program, The Disney Approach to Customer Loyalty: Creating Service that Keeps Your Customers Coming Back.

He wrote a three-part series of articles on his experience, and what he learned, which can be accessed on his LinkedIn Influencer blog page, at:

For historical information on Disney University, we drew from the book by Doug Lipp, Disney University: How Disney University Develops the World’sMost Engaged, Loyal, and Customer-Centric Employees (2013).

Van France founded Disney University, which is part of the HR division of Disney, in 1962, seven years after opening Disneyland (the Disney Institute was launched in 1986 and open to the public).

Disney U is the “conscience of the organizational culture,” and Van was instrumental in changing the language: On stage/backstage, Costumes (not uniforms), Audience (not crowds), Theme (not amusement) park, good/bad show.

He wrote a memorandum on September 21, 1962 that challenged Disney’s executives and Cast Members to up their games:

Disneyland will never be completed. We’ve certainly lived up to that promise.
But what about the people who operate it? Are we growing with the show or just getting older?
The trouble with people is that we get hardening of the  mental arteries, cirrhosis of the enthusiasm, and arthritis of the imagination, along with chronic and sometimes acute allergies to supervision, subordinates, the whole darned system.
Is it possible that what we have gained through experience, we have lost through habit, and that what we have gained through organization, we have lost in enthusiasm?

He believed “training is not a car wash” that you simply process employees through.

Ed and I prefer the word “education” instead of “training,” mostly because animals are trained while human beings are educated.

Our late colleague, Paul O’Byrne, used to drive the distinction between these two words home by using a question that you’ll never forget: Would you rather your 13-year-old daughter receive sex training or sex education?

Disney’s Park Operation Priorities are as follows:

  1. Safety
  2. Courtesy
  3. Show
  4. Capacity/Efficiency—the first 3 ensure this one is sustainable

Notice that efficiency is last, while the first three all deal with effectiveness.

Van also believed that it was as much about attitude as budgets; money may be tight, but creativity is free; and that budgets are the coward’s way out of any problem.

Van’s Model for educational programs: Make it simple, not simplistic; make it enjoyable; design experiential activities that make it memorable.

Be sure to check out our show (#49) with former Disney Executive Lee Cockerell, who was Executive Vice President of Operations for the Walt Disney World Resort for 10 years.

Other books recommend’s on Disney:

Window on Main Street: 35 Years of Creating Happiness at Disneyland, Van Arsdale France, founder of Disney University

Disney University, Doug Lipp

Think Out of the Box, Mike Vance, former Dean of Disney University

Imagineering Way, The Imagineers

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #136: Free-Rider Friday - March 2017

Ron’s Topics

“European country imposes ‘social parasite’ tax on the poor,” March 27, 2017, New York Post (originally published in News.com.au).

Belarus, country of 9.5 million, lies between Russia and Poland, has implemented a “social parasite tax on the chronically unemployed (also known as the “spongers” or “freeloaders” tax).

It’s $233 (a month’s average wage in the country), for those “work shy” for longer than six months.

President Alexander Lukashenko issued Presidential Decree number 3, in 2015. Failure to pay could ultimately lead to imprisonment, redolent of the old USSR’s concept of “social parasitism.”

After protests, the president agreed to delay the tax, but not eliminate it. It’s estimated that one million are out of work in the country.

This story reminded me of a Harvard Lampoon story from the 1970s about how unfair the tax system is to the rich, since they cannot deduct their Rolls Royce’s and private jets, but the poor can deduct all the kids they have.

The difference is, this story on Belarus is real.

Counsel of protection: the future of insurance,” The Economist, March 11, 2017

the insurance industry is estimated to be $4.6 trillion worldwide.

New York startup Lemonade is a homeowners and renters insurance company, with an app that makes insurance claims easier, and appeals to the digital generation.

It sold 2,000 policies in the first 100 days, 80% to first-time buyers. It uses AI and machine learning to process claims and underwrite policies.

It further rewards under-claiming, giving a share of the savings to your choice of charity (25% Americans defraud insurance companies).

On policy holder used the app to file a claim for a stolen coat, answered a few questions, and in three seconds the claim was paid.

Two Sigma, a large “quant” hedge fund, is also betting number crunching algorithms can gauge risk and set prices better than humans.

Simplesurance, a German firm, has integrated product-warranty insurance into e-commerce sites.

New kinds of risk-prevention services are being implemented thanks to the Internet of Things, such as sensors on incoming water pipes that can detect minuscule leaks, and prevent larger claims for flood damage.

Insurance companies are enticing policyholders with cutting premiums rather than making money from these additional services.

Volvo and Mercedes have announced they are so confident in their self-driving cars, they will not buy insurance at all!

The wonder drug,” The Economist, March 4, 2017

Digitising the health care industry--$18B of capital has been invested in USA digital startup funding between 2015-2018.

Three groups are fighting over the “heath care value chain”:

  1. Traditional innovators—pharma, hospitals, medical tech companies
  2. Incumbent players—health insurers, big pharma buyers, UK’s NHS
  3. Tech insurgents—Google, Amazon, Apple, creating apps, predictive diagnostics systems, and new devices

Buyers increasingly demand “value-based” reimbursement: If the drug and device doesn’t function, it will not be bought. One analyst says if pharma firms don’t put the patient, rather than drug sales, at the center of strategy, they risk losing relevance.

Also, the point of care will move rapidly into the home where heart condition can be monitored, concussions diagnosed and perhaps even predict the onset of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, menopause, etc.

London-based startup Babylon can schedule an online Dr. appoint for $24, and estimates that 85% of consultations don’t need to be in person.

But government could slow down the diffusion of this technology, as this article makes clear: “Cronyism thwarts telemedicine and other innovations,” by Veronique de Rugy.

High-resolution camera phones are good for diagnosing moles, rash, and even eye exams.

However the California State Board of Optometry launched, with taxpayer money, a PR campaign against one such startup.

Indiana passed a law last year that prevents online eye exams, as did Georgia and South Carolina, while VA is about to do the same.

Also, State Boards in various states prohibit doctors in another state offering telemedicine to its residents.

A Brief History of Blockchain,” Vinay Gupta, Harvard Business Review, February 28, 2017

In just 10 years:

  1. Bitcoin
  2. Blockchain (could be separated)
  3. Smart contract, ethereum
  4. New innovation: “proof of stake” rather than “proof of work” (group with largest total computing power makes decisions).
  5. Blockchain scaling: now every computer processes every transaction, which is slow. New: figure how many computers are necessary to validate each transaction, divide work efficiently: speed can go head-to-head with VISA, and SWIFT in terms of processing payments.

Dubai’s blockchain strategy: issue all government documents on blockchain by 2020, which was designed by Vinay Gupta, the author of this post.

Furry profitable,” The Economist, February 4, 2017

VCA, animal hospital chain has a 42,000-square-foot clinic in Hollywood.

VCA was purchased in January by Mars for $9.1B. Mars is second only to Nestle in pet food, and has been getting stiff competition from Amazon, so they are turning towards animal health.

In the USA, spending in pet clinics was $13.7 billion in 2012, and $16 billion in 2016.

VCA will own 1,900 veterinary clinics in America and Canada, four times as many as National Veterinary Associates, its nearest competitor.

The average vet used to be a generalist, but today there are over 40 specialties.

Technically, in many states, it is illegal for corporations to own veterinary practices, but there are ways to structure ownership to get around this.

And since pets count as property, malpractice risk is not very large.

Ed’s Topics

  1. Ad Agency in UK drops Google - How responsible is Google for links that are associated with other searches?
  2. The Guardian, 3/28, Robots vs. Human Experts, by Richard and Daniel Susskind - The Susskinds reflect on the reaction to their book over a year and half after its publication. (Listen to Daniel Susskind's appearance on our show.)
  3. Japan Times, China’s toilet paper thieves - High tech solution to a low tech problem.
  4. US Obamacare, Congress fails to repeal - The GOP had seven years to think about this and they dropped the ball on the goal line. 
  5. NY Times story stating 39% of colleges have reported declines in international student applications. They attributed this to Trump's election. Tyler Cowan analyzed the story on his blog - One real blooper I cannot let pass
  6. Live action Beauty and the Beast, Dan Sanchez, FEE article, Belle's Tax-funded Fairy Tale. Fun, true, and why libertarians ruin everything. 

BONUS article: How Beauty & the Beast is an example of anarchy done right. 

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #135: Request for Proposals: Avoiding the Winner’s Curse

“Never forget that your weapon is made by the lowest bidder.” –Law Number 20 of Murphy’s Laws of Combat

Simply put, don't do them

We at VeraSage recommend that you do not do RFPs, because they subsidize dysfunctional buying behavior, often being used as a club to extract concessions from the current provider by customers who have no intention of changing suppliers. 

Or they are used by price sensitive customers you do not want anyway. We also suggest you charge for an RFP. Why not? The customers are asking you to compete, which has value in and of itself. 

If you charged for an RFP, like charging for admission into your firm, it might actually be a process that created some value, rather than merely reciting deliverables.

That said, many firms have to do a certain amount of RFPs. If you do, you should be well versed with what economists call the winner’s curse.

Avoiding the Winner's Curse

In auction markets, economists refer to the dreaded winner’s curse—whereby the winning bidder is often a loser, because obviously all of the other bidders believed the engagement had less value.

In other words, the only request for proposals (RFPs) that buyers will accept are ones you should not make. One of the ways to avoid the winner’s curse is to bid more conservatively when there are more bidders. Thomas Nagle and Reed Holden explain why in their book, The Strategy and Tactics of Pricing:

The more bidders there are, the more likely you will lose money on every job you win, even if on average you estimate costs correctly and both you and your competitors set bids that include a reasonable margin of profit. The reason: The bids you win are not a random sample of the bids you make. You are much more likely to win jobs for which you have underestimated your costs and are unlikely to win those for which you have overestimated your cost.

The only solution to this is, in effect, to formalize the principle of “selective participation.” You do that by adding a “fudge factor” to each bid to reflect an estimate of how much you are likely to have underestimated your costs if you actually win a bid. Needless to say, adding this factor will reduce the number of bids you win, but it will ensure that you won’t ultimately regret having won them.

RFPs have become more commonplace as competitive bidding has replaced negotiation for price buyers. It is as if dysfunctional buying practices have arisen to counter dysfunctional selling practices.

It is important to have some contact with the economic buyer—that is, the person who can actually make the decision to hire you, rather than just the procurement department. You need to find the person who can say “Yes,” not just the ones who can say “No.”

Establishing relationships and having internal advocates in the customer’s enterprise also helps to ensure your value is being considered, not just price.

Another strategy with RFPs is: No surprises. Your potential customer should know everything in your RFP before you submit it. Gaining an understanding of your customer’s expectations, business model—how they make money—and how your company can add value is imperative to increase your odds of a successful RFP, one that won’t suffer from the winner’s curse.

Co-Opetition
$11.71
By Adam M. Brandenburger, Barry J. Nalebuff

Co-opetition by Adam M. Brandenburg and Barry J. Nalebuff also discuss the following eight hidden costs of bidding that are also worth considering:

  1. There are better uses of your time.
  2. When you win the business, you lose money.
  3. The incumbent can retaliate.
  4. Your existing customers will want a better deal.
  5. New customers will use the low price as a benchmark.
  6. Competitors will also use the low price as a benchmark.
  7. It does not help to give your customer’s competitors a better cost position.
  8. Do not destroy your competitor’s glass houses.

Other RFP strategies

  • The RFP is not about your firm, it is about the value you will add to your customer—focus on how they will change, not your firm’s history and processes.
  • What is your competitive differentiation? If you do not have one, do you expect to be successful with this RFP?
  • Always submit options, at various value/price points, with any RFP.
  • What would justify the customer paying a premium price?
  • Are you dealing with the economic buyer? If not, you probably should not waste your time with an RFP.
  • Is the organization using the RFP process as “column fodder”—that is, to beat up its existing firm?
  • How you sell is a sample of how you solve—be creative, innovative, and different.
  • RFPs do not sell, people do.
  • Never submit an RFP to people whose criteria for judging your success are unknown.
  • What does the customer expect from their firm? How will you exceed those expectations?
  • Do not let the RFP be the first time you “test” your price with a customer.
  • Do not be constrained by the customer’s “budget.” As the opening email of this Appendix confirms, budgets are elastic, and if the economic buyer understands the value, the money will be found from somewhere else in the budget.
  • See if you can propose on a greater share of the customer’s business.
  • Consider charging for your RFP to test the customer’s seriousness, providing a full (or partial) credit if your firm is selected.
  • If you win this RFP, what will be the impact on the firm’s self-esteem?
  • If you have a 25 percent market share, you should be losing 3 out of 4 of your RFPs. In other words, do not worry about losing more RFPs than you gain.
  • Once you submit an RFP, you lose all control and leverage, leaving you asking “Have you made a decision yet?” If your RFP is innovative and surprises the customer, you will change the standard operating procedures.
  • Put a deadline on the price. No price should last indefinitely. Three weeks is a good rule of thumb.
  • Copyright all your RFPs so the firm retains the intellectual property rights (especially for advertising agencies).
  • If the customer asks you to match a competitor’s lower priced bid, be sure to understand the scope of work that the lower price is based on.
  • If your RFP is rejected based upon price, ask the economic buyer:
  • Do you not believe the value we discussed is accurate?
  • Do you not believe that we will be able to create that value?
  • Or do you think you will be able to acquire that value from another firm?

Recognizing not all customers are created equal, should be charged the same price, or accepted, or proposed for, in the first place, is essential to avoiding Baker’s Law: Bad Customers Drive Out Good Customers.

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #134: Second Interview with Father Robert Sirico

Biography

Father Robert Sirico is the president of the Acton Institute, He lectures at colleges, universities, and business organizations throughout the U.S. and abroad.  His writings on religious, political, economic, and social matters are published in a variety of journals, including: the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal. He is also a parish priest in Grand Rapids MichiganIn his recent book Defending the Free Market: The Moral Case for a Free Economy, Rev. Sirico shows how a free economy is not only the best way to meet society's material needs but also the surest protection of human dignity against government encroachment.

Segment One—Ed      

Note: Our first interview can be heard here

Has the bishop in Grand Rapids given you the dispensation to eat corn beef and cabbage today (St. Patrick’s Day)?

Father Sirico is working on an Italian edition of his book, Defending the Free Market, due out this Spring.

I see, based on your twitter page, that you have met the Holy Father. How did that go? Father Sirico gave the Pope a copy of the movie, Poverty, Inc.

Regarding Pope Francis, is it too simplistic to excuse his thoughts on capitalism as just being due to his Weltanschauung of capitalism equaling cronyism?

On Twitter, one person said, "Since [Father Sirico] propagates views opposite to  decades of established Catholic social teaching, however, he ought to be excommunicated.”

Today, I was told in a Catholic Social Teaching Facebook group, when I suggested that federal welfare programs perhaps do more harm than good, he replied, "More harm than good? Wow, not allowing destitute senior citizens and at-risk poor kids starve to death is somehow harmful? We in America are a society, a community, and will be judged on how the weakest among us are treated. And you, sir, get an F.” 

I think this is because many people fail to understand the difference between civil society and government. Your thoughts?

Segment Two and Three—Ron

The entire discussion in these two segments were about Acton Institute’s latest movie, Poverty, Inc.

The movie open with this Machivelli quote: “The reason there will be no change is because the people who stand to lose from change have all the power, and the people who stand to gain from change have no power.”

Why does that describe the “global aid system” today?

It’s hard to compete with free. How can markets develop when shoes, food, etc., are given away for free. When Peggy Noonan asks Ronald Reagan: “What’s wrong with socialism?” Reagan replied, Well, it doesn’t work”

The movie takes on the Christmas song by Band-Aid song (“Feed the World”). It gives the impression that Africa is desolate, that nothing grows there, etc. Yet Africa is rich in oil, diamonds, gold, and other natural resources. The problem is it is disconnected from trade.

Government-to-Government Aid

The movie shows Bill Clinton admitting he was wrong with regard to Haiti by selling rice so the country could supposedly leap past the agriculture stage of development and skip to the industrial stage.

Agricultural subsidies keeps out poor farmers from selling to rich countries, while rich countries produce surpluses which they then sell/give to poor countries, which drives out of business local farmers.

The dignity of work is so important.

The only antidote to poverty is wealth, yet the poverty infrastructure never discusses wealth creation.

NonGovernment Organizations

Someone in the movies discusses a conversation where the person says, Now that you survived the earthquake, I hope you survive the arrival of all the NGOs.

There are over 10,000 NGOs in Haiti!

But when you give someone something for free, continuously, not only do you create dependence, but eventually you create resentment as well.

There’s nothing wrong with disaster relief, but when they stay for 40 years we have a problem.

Foreign Aid (“Official Development Assistance”)

Since Post WWII, the Breton Woods system created the International Montetary Fund and the World Bank, and of course we had the Marshall Plan. Even the Catholic Relief Charities receive 70% of its funding from government.

But not one country has ever developed from aid, not one!

Social Entrepreneurs

Does the founder of TOMS shoes really want people to not have shoes for the rest of lives?

If TOMS shoes is successful within the existing framework, all you are doing is making the existing system more harmful. Doing the wrong thing more efficiently is just creating more harm.

Adoption

The movie shows a couple who were spending $20,000 to adopt a Haitian child whose mother wants him. Approximately 80% of Haitians kids have at least one parent; they are called “poverty orphans.”

Because orphanages are coveted positions: they provide an education, food, shelter, etc.

One mother got a job, and moved from a tent to buying her own two-bedroom home.

Credit

The movie interviews Muhammad Yunus, the microfinance founder. While small and  large companies can get credit, the middle-sized business does not. If they do, it can cost 6-10% per month in interest.

As microfinance failed, or perhaps not lived up to its hyped expectations?

Rule of law

Poor countries lack secure private property rights, functioning courts to adjudicate disputes, and most people are locked out of the formal economy.

The economist Hernando de Soto says in 2/3 of world, there’s no rule of law.

No property rights means for the 60-70 million farmers in Ghana, they might have to buy their land 4-5 times. In Peru, it takes 289 days, working 8 hours per day, to start a business. De Soto documents all of this, and more, in his book: The Mystery of Capital.

Theological Question

Rabbi Daniel Lapin wrote in his book, Business Secrets of the Bible: “The opposite of wealth is evil. If wealth is not being created, then evil is being done.”

Do you agree?

Celebrities (the “Icons of charity”)

Bono admitted that commerce lifts more people out of poverty than aid. However, he insists aid is still needed, unless you are “brain and heart dead extremists.” He also insists that we need to move from paternalism to partnership.

There’s not enough talk about wealth creation.

Ron’s Thoughts on the Movie

1. Wealth is the only known antidote to poverty. We only have the word poor because of the Bible.

2. The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

3. Modified Christopher Hitchens quote: The icons of charity are “not friends of the poor, but friends of poverty.” It’s obvious that who benefits from the existing system are all of the players mentioned above, not the poor they sanctimoniously say they are helping.

Last Segment—Ed

During the end of our last interview, you said you were considering writing a book on economics and the parable of our Lord. Here is one I often use, but I wonder if I perhaps am taking it too far out of context?

Luke 12: 13 Someone in the crowd said to him, “Teacher, tell my brother to divide the family inheritance with me.” 14 But he said to him, “Friend, who set me to be a judge or arbitrator over you?”

What are your thoughts on the difference between empathy (I feel your pain) and compassion (to suffer with)?

Another word we do not hear talked about much today is “maturity.” It certainly isn’t displayed by both sides of the aisle in Washington DC.

What are your thoughts on sanctuary cities?

1 Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #133: Interview with Tim Williams

Ron and Ed interviewed Tim Williams, a noted author, international speaker, and presenter for major advertising associations, agency networks, universities, and business conferences worldwide. Tim is author of the books, “Take a Stand for Your Brand: Building a Great Agency Brand from the Inside Out,” ranked by Amazon as one of the top ten books on brand building; “Defining the Agency Brand,” published by the American Association of Advertising Agencies is regarded as the standard in agency brand development; and his latest book is Positioning for Professionals: How Professional Knowledge Firms Can Differentiate Their Way to Success. Tim is a major thought leader and consultant to advertising agencies worldwide, specializing in pricing, business model innovation, positioning, and strategy.

Segment One - Ron's Questions

With Hollywood about to release CHPS - The Movie, is this proof that ideas are more valuable than their execution?

In your book, you say, "In business, imitation is not the sincerest form of flattery, it is just lazy," why is that?

Every value prop falls in somewhere in following three areas: points of parity, points of relevance, and points of differentiation, please explain these ideas.

How is a firm defined by what it is NOT?

Segment Two - Ed's Questions

Click to listen to Tim's first appearance

What are the four sides of the strategic box or brand boundaries?

Other than calling which one do professional firms struggle with the most.

What is the complexity tax or diversification discount?

Explain Magic work vs Logic work. Does the line between them shift?

Segment Three - Ron's Questions

How are AI, deep learning and other technologies unfolding in the advertising agency space?

How is it encroaching on the Magic work?

Five holding companies own 85 percent of advertising agencies, are they innovating? If so, how?

Do you see agencies making progress in pricing?

Do you see agencies making progress on getting rid of timesheets?

Some of the world's best know brands were not created with the help of an advertising agency, explain the effect of this on agencies.

Segment Four - Listener Question

Justin asks, “As agency leadership, how should you balance the need for specialization (in order to grow faster) with synthesizing other disciplines to come up with greater innovation?”

Do you view more ideas coming from independent thinking or brainstorming meetings?

Do you see more agencies getting involved in behavioral economics?

What are working on?

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #132: The Deleterious Effects of Hourly Billing

Custom doth make dotards of us all. –Thomas Carlyle, Sartor Resartus, III, 1836

If people are supposedly rational, why have the professions continued to apply the wrong theory of value to their services?

The fact that hourly billing is so deeply entrenched and has been widely used for decades proves that is has some advantages.

The case against the billable hour is not that it is not a profitable pricing policy.

Rather, the case being made is that hourly billing is suboptimal (if profitability is your goal), and its disadvantages outweigh its advantages.

The Advantages of Hourly Billing

Hourly Billing is Easy and Efficient

Hourly billing can be handled simply with appropriate time and billing software, turning the pricing function into an administrative task handled by less costly personnel, freeing up the professional team to take care of what is more important—customer relations.

Hourly Billing is Perceived as Fair

Since hourly billing is largely justified based on a firm’s costs and a “reasonable” profit margin, it is perceived as “fair” by customers.

Hourly Billing Provides Market Stability

Since hourly rates remain relatively stable, this provides a desirable stability and predictability among buyers and sellers, as opposed to widely varying prices that may arise under a value pricing scenario.

Sometimes the Customer Demands Hourly Billing

It is rare, but there are instances when customers will insist on being charged by the hour. One encounters this attitude most frequently in the legal profession, and to a lesser extent, in the accounting profession.

Probably because the people hiring the firm were themselves alumni, raised on the virtues of hourly billing. But it is folly to turn this type of power over to your customers.

You control your pricing strategy, not your customers.

They judge your value, but cannot dictate how you price. This is not a large barrier to overcoming hourly billing. The problem is not with customers; it is with the professionals.

Hourly Billing is Required in Case of Litigation

Certain court cases require time recording due to legal precedent, fee shifting, and legal ethical rules.

Bankruptcy requires attorneys to keep time in six-minute increments. If your firm does a majority of this type of work, then you may very well be stuck with the billable hour.

Hourly Billing Leads to Higher Volume

Higher prices would dampen demand for professional services, and some projects simply cannot be quoted upfront without a high price being specified.

Hourly Billing is a Cost-Accounting, Productivity, and Project Management Tool

Check out our shows, #109, Trashing The Timesheet, and #112, our interview with Dr. Reginald Tomas Lee on lies and cost accounting.

Hourly Billing Transfers Risk to the Customer

This advantage is truly a double-edge sword. Professionals tend to be risk adverse, and hourly billing places a comfortable floor on their profits.

However, professionals have paid a high “reverse risk premium” to the customer for this floor. If the customer assumes the risk, the professional will only receive their hourly rate; no more, usually less.

Hourly Billing Has Served Us Well, Why Should We Change?

Economist Herbert A. Simon’s autobiography, Models of My Life. Among economists, Simon is best known for his theories of bounded rationality and satisficing.

Bounded rationality posits that both elements of irrational and nonrational behavior bound the area of rational behavior.

Satisficing posits that people search for good enough actions rather than optimal ones. Coupling the concept of satisficing to bounded rationality is how Simon explains how people really make decisions.

Rather than attempting to maximize or optimize, people search for “good enough” actions. Simon writes:

 [Even Darwin’s] natural selection only predicts that survivors will be fit enough, that is, fitter than their losing competitors; it postulates satisficing, not optimizing.

The Disadvantages of Hourly Billing

Hourly Billing Misaligns the Interests of Professional and Customer

Even supporters of hourly billing will admit that there exists, right from the start, a conflict between the professional’s interest and the customer’s.

This conflict of interest also exists because in a cost-plus pricing system one way to increase a firm’s revenue is to increase its costs.

Aligning incentives is difficult enough to achieve without the added burden of an inherent conflict in how your price your services.

Hourly Billing Focuses on Hours, Not Value

Whenever professionals have to justify price to a customer, they inevitably resort to discussing hours spent. Marketers would never do this, as they always try to create value in the minds of the customer first, and talk price later.

Hourly Billing Places the Risk on the Customer

Risk is where profits come from. If you offer customers fixed prices you will be able to charge a premium simply because you are reducing their risk.

If this sounds counterintuitive, consider the mortgage market. Which commands a higher interest rate, a fixed rate or an adjustable rate mortgage?

Hourly Billing Fosters a Production Mentality, Not an Entrepreneurial or Knowledge Worker Spirit

Over the decades of the billable hour’s hegemony, the professions have lost sight of the all-important question: “What did we accomplish?” It has been replaced with: “How many hours did you bill?”

Hourly Billing Creates a Nonsensical Subsidy System

An example of a nonsensical subsidy is a tax research project that is billed to the first customer for, say, $10,000. If a second customer appears the following week with the exact same issue, how much should the firm charge the second customer? Following the logic and ethics of hourly billing the answer is clear: you can only charge the second customer for the actual hours spent.

Under this method, one could argue that the first customer underwrote the R&D costs for the second customer. It would be as if a pharmaceutical company charged the first customer for all its R&D, while the following customers were charged just the marginal cost of producing the drug.

Hourly Billing Cannot Price Risk

Completing a divorce for Brittany Spears is fraught with more risk than a couple with limited assets. Risk cannot be priced by the hour. Actuaries have an axiom that is useful to remember: There is no such thing as a bad risk; only bad premiums.

Hourly Billing is not Predictive of a True Professional

One of the most useless pieces of information we can gather as outsiders about a firm, or a professional who works in it, is billable hours. It transmits little information of value, though it does highlight the “finders” (rainmakers), the “minders” (managers), and the “grinders” (technicians)—billable hours are hardly necessary, though, to make this distinction.

Far more meaning is discovered by judging a professional’s customer service attitude, customer defection and retention rates, customer loyalty, profitability and collection speed, creativity and innovation, risk taking, willingness to delegate, teaching and learning skills, and practice development activities. Billable hours shed no light in these virtues, as most need to be judged and experienced, not measured.

Hourly Billing Encourages Hoarding of Hours

David Maister and Patrick McKenna say that “Estimates given to us by our clients of the amount [of work they do] that could be done by someone more junior range up to 50 percent or more of each senior person’s time.

Surgeons piercing ears is not the road to maximum profitability.

Hourly Billing Focuses on Effort, Not Results

Who buys efforts in the marketplace? One brilliant epiphany that occurs while in the shower or driving may be worth more to the customer than 1,000 plodding, ineffective hours spent researching and pondering an issue. Hourly billing simply does not reward creativity and ingenuity. On the contrary, it rewards inexperience, inefficiency, and even incompetence—the slowest horse wins the race.

Hourly Billing Penalizes Technological Advances

Every year, professional firms make substantial investments in technology that allow any given task to be performed in less time. Perversely, under the billable hour, firm revenue will then decline, unless hourly rates keep pace with productivity increases—what economists call the productivity paradox.

Hourly Rates Are Set by Reverse Competition

This means you look at the rates of your fellow professionals operating in your geographical market, make a decision on where you want to fit in on the competitive spectrum, and set your rates accordingly.

Hourly Billing Prices the Service, Not the Customer

In a world where value is subjective, no two customers are alike, and professional firms have the enormous advantage of meeting personally with each and every customer, the mindset of pricing services is obsolete. Instead, the customer needs to be priced.

Hourly Billing Creates Bureaucracy

We estimates that somewhere between 7 and 20 percent of a firm’s gross revenue is spent tracking, reporting, compiling, reviewing, and billing time, an astonishing investment. What’s the ROI? Most firms don’t even ask.

Hourly Billing Does Not Set the Price Up Front

The most absurd and economically illogical effect of hourly billing is how it denies the ability to quote a price before the work begins. Few products or services in the marketplace are purchased without the customer knowing the price in advance.

Hourly Billing Does Not Differentiate Your Firm

Converting their crown jewels of experience, expertise, culture, intellectual capital, and relationships into a commodity, codified in an hourly rate, is no way to differentiate your firm from the competition.

Hourly Billing Does Not Measure How Much Money is Being Left on the Table

Even though one of the major defenses of hourly billing and timesheets is they are essential cost-accounting tools to determine profitability, this method has a glaring weakness: It has no way to capture how much the price could have been.

In other words, how much money is the firm leaving on the table by setting prices too low? No cost accounting, realization, or, timesheet report can answer this question.

When Google began its auction-based AdWords program, CEO Eric Schmidt was petrified it would not set prices as high as Google’s salespeople were getting.

In three short weeks Schmidt’s fears were calmed when the new pricing strategy had doubled revenue.

It became obvious at that point that salespeople were under pricing ads, not over pricing them, which is the direction most pricing mistakes are made.

Without the willingness to test this new pricing strategy, Google would have left untold millions on the table, and worse, if they had been using the billable hour, they would have never learned about it.

Hourly Billing Diminishes the Quality of Life

There is no doubt that morale in the professions is suffering, and one major cause is the relentless pursuit of the Almighty Billable Hour.

This lessening in the quality of life results in a high cost to firms, measured in associate turnover, low morale, absenteeism, ineffectiveness, neglect of practice development, continuing education, and so on.

These costs should be included in any cost/benefit analysis of maintaining hourly billing; these costs, in and of themselves, are likely to dwarf any benefits derived.

Hourly Billing Limits Your Income Potential

This is, without a doubt, the most egregious effect of the hourly billing regime. There are only so many hours in a year. On average, Bill Gates has just as much time on this mortal coil as the rest of us, so why does he make more money? The difference is he does not believe he sells time.

Summary and Conclusions

Oscar Wilde’s line sums up hourly billing with just the proper amount of irony: “He has no enemies, but is intensely disliked by his friends.”

It has become, to borrow a term from the medical profession, an iatrogenic illness—that is, a disease caused by the doctor.

Albert Einstein once wrote, “Our theories determine what we measure.” Hourly billing is the wrong theory that measures the wrong things.

Funny video from North, a 40-person ad agency in Portland, Oregon that has been operating without timesheets since 2011:

Ed’s blog post on the David Ricardo Effect

Thanks to BJ Lee for his recent iTunes Review:

I thought this podcast was going to be two ivory-tower, automaton-sounding economists discussing how many angels it will take to run a big enterprise. But they have warmly shifted the way my mind words when it comes both to my little online business and freelancing, and to larger economies. And it has made us much more profitable. Can’t wait to pass this wisdom on to my kids. If you love Freakonomics Radio, you will love this podcast. Thanks Ron and Ed!

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #131: Free-Rider Friday—February 2017

Ron’s Topics

More Hokum

As a follow-up to last week’s show on Personality Profiling: Helpful or Hokum?, I came across an updated article by Annie Murphy Paul, author of The Cult of Personality Testing, a devastating book on the cult of these profiles.

She’s even more critical of them in this article than in her book.

Personality Tests Are Popular, But Do They Capture The Real You?”, June 25, 2016, by Annie Murphy Paul

Dramatically Reducing World Hunger

A hungry world no more,” by Kevin D. Williamson, February 22, 2017, National Review Online

An excellent look at how world hunger has dropped dramatically. Another great, untold story of the power of the free market to alleviate misery and raise the standards of living of the poor everywhere.

Robots Pay Taxes?

Bill Gates: Job-stealing robots should pay income taxes,” from CNBC.

The robot that takes your job should pay taxes,” says Bill Gates, Quartz, February 17, 2017.

Here’s the video of the Gates interview:

 

My only question is if Gates would have been a proponent of taxing Microsoft Office for displacing jobs, and slowing down the diffusion of the software?

Number One Job

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey, which conducts a survey every two years that extrapolates current trends in various categories of jobs, and predicts the growth over the next ten years, the top job growth, with 108% expected growth, is: Wind turbine service technician.

Of course, this entire industry wouldn’t exist without government subsidies.

Other jobs with expected growth rates from 43% to 27% include: Occupational-therapy assistants, physical-therapy assistants, home-health aides, commercial drivers, nurse practitioners, statisticians, personal financial advisers, and optometrists.

See “Apply within,” from The Economist: The World in 2017.

Mark Cuban, in an interview on Bloomberg TV, said that candidates who excel at creative and critical thinking will be in greatest demand in the coming years. This means more majors in the liberal arts, such as English, philosophy, and foreign languages.

Management Ideas, RIP?

The Economist, Schumpeter, “Management theory is becoming a compendium of dead ideas,” December 17, 2016.

Business schools are the cathedrals of capitalism, and business consultants are its traveling friars. Yet management theory is ripe for a reformation. There are three myths it propounds:

Myth 1: Business is more competitive than ever

The story since 2008 has been not competition but consolidation, with over 30,000 M&A deals done every year, approximately 3% of GDP.

Myth 2: We live in an age of entrepreneurialism

The rate of business creation has declined since 1970s. One cause is a tax system that punishes growth (it’s not a tax on the rich, but on getting rich).

Myth 3: Business is getting faster

In some ways, it’s slowing down (regulations, compliance, FDA drug approval process, etc.).

Language Alert: All transformation is linguistic. Keep your eyes open for stories in the media about Trump reducing “Protections,” rather than “Regulations.”

The glaring weakness in management theory: its naivety about politics.

As a follow-up, in The Economist: The World in 2017, “Practice makes perfect” it reports that China cranks out about 50,000 MBAs every year, less than half the rate in the USA. But these are based mostly on Western knowledge.

It’s private firms that are innovating management methods, such as Alibaba, an e-commerce giant that pioneered escrow in its payment system, and WeChat, the world’s most advanced messaging and payment platform.

Chinese companies are rejecting the Western principle of core competence. Instead, “multiple jumping” is the new fad.

Baidu started as a search company, then moved into mapping and apps, and now AI and autonomous cars.

One Chinese consultant said of multiple jumping: “…the most critical event in global management science in 30 years, and the new inspiration is coming form China.”

Count me among the skeptics. Is Google, or Apple, not multiple jumping? Many Chinese companies rely too much on low prices, which is not sustainable in the long-term. One skeptic pointed out that even Baidu’s sexier investments couldn’t happen without government support.

Ed’s Topics

San Diego Story regarding pricing and personality profiles and an awful sign:

Prices should never be justified by an increase to costs. That said, prices (in this case wages) should not be set by government fiat. I am not sure which is worse. 

IBM Watson and H&R Block

AI might do your taxes this year, courtesy of IBM Watson from TechRepublic.

In partnership with H&R Block, IBM Watson's cognitive computing engine will be used to help tax filers maximize their returns.

Pine City, MN high-school only shoots 3s and layups

The Basketball Team That Never Takes a Bad Shot - WSJ (subscription required)

The NBA’s most efficient offenses seek out layups and threes. A high school in Minnesota takes the idea to the extreme.

On Bullet Proof Coffee and Kerrygold Butter 

This State Is Now "Protecting" You from Kerrygold Butter by Brittany Hunter

Food bureaucrats cannot stand to see a rule being broken, no matter how arbitrary it may be.

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #130: Personality Profiling: Helpful or Hokum?

First Up

Ed challenges you to to determine if the follow are from his horoscope or a personality profile. See answers at the bottom of the post.

  1. Horoscope or profile: Some words that describe you are: Directive, Decisive, Driven, and Friendly. You are task-oriented, and you probably get a great deal done. You probably like problem solving and getting results. You are comfortable interacting with others to make things happen. 
  2. Horoscope or profile: If you have been given a task to do that hasn't been explained properly, you may feel at a loss. It's best to go back to the person who assigned the work and ask for more details. This could be temporarily humbling, but remember, it's better to ask a stupid question than to make a stupid mistake.
  3. Horoscope or profile: It can be very difficult to work with a (Type or sign) as a co-worker. They are very ambitious and very hard workers—in fact, they have a tendency to overwork in order to accomplish the goals they have for themselves or to make themselves look good in the eyes of their managers and supervisors. They will do whatever is necessary to meet goals that will make them look good in the eyes of their superiors and don’t care whose feet they must step on in order to accomplish those goals.
  4. Horoscope or profile: (Type or sign) are natural-born leaders and embody the gifts of charisma and confidence, and project authority in a way that draws crowds together behind a common goal. (Type or sign) are characterized by an often ruthless level of rationality, using their drive, determination and sharp minds to achieve whatever end they’ve set for themselves.

 Some background

Carl Jung pondered differences in personalities for a deeply personal reason: his split with Sigmund Freud caused him deep depression. Why did they see things so differently?

He concluded Freud was an extrovert while he was an introvert. Jung believed that personality was dynamic and it could change throughout life.

“Every individual is an exception to the rule. To stick labels on people is nothing but a childish parlor game.”

A midwestern mental hospital is where The Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI) was created in the 1930s to sort mental patients into diagnostic categories.

It was a 567-questionnaire, and the quantification it provided gave it more validity than inkblots. Starke Hathaway, the developer, became skeptical in old age of assessments, doubting that personality profiling was possible at all.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), 1940s

Some facts

  • This is the leading profiling test administered.
  • 89% of the Fortune 100 use Myers-Briggs
  • 2.5 million people each year take it
  • Some 2500 profiles are on market
  • It’s a $500 million industry, with 8-10% annual growth
  • Thrived in the shade of casual neglect

Created by Pennsylvania housewife Isabel Myers, along with her mother Katharine Briggs. Isabel thought the test could bring about world peace:

If President Woodrow Wilson had not been so wrapped up in his own introversion, he would have negotiated more effectively as Versailles, and World War II might have been averted.

Personality profiles were used to combat Frederick Taylor’s “one best way.” It was people themselves that need sorting and shaping, since every position in the company had the right profile fit.

Jesus was an ENTP, so is Steve Wozniak. Don’t ask how they know about Jesus. Of course, popularity does not at imply scientific validity.

Test data is confidential, so cannot be tested to determine effectiveness. The tests are popular among consultants, who are paid good money to administer them in a convivial atmosphere.

The fallacy is the tests measure what we are like and who we are, not what we know, believe, or what we can do. They confuse labeling personality with understanding it. They confirm what people already know about themselves (the “aha reaction”), what psychologists call the permanency tendency. They also tend to validate the positive characteristics we all believe we possess, the so-called Pollyanna principle.

As they say, if you really want to learn what someone is like, marry them or work for them. Annie Murphy Paul, former senior editor at Psychology Today, has written a scathing indictment against these tests, labeling them modern-day phrenology—the “science of the mind” (“bumpology”). A leading Phrenologist was Franz Joseph Gall, University of Vienna, in the 1870s:

  • Phrenologize Our Nation, for thereby it will Reform the World!
  • Phrenology will improve the prosperity and material good of the next generation and greatly enhance the happiness of the race, besides abolishing poverty and nearly abolishing crime.
  • Walt Whitman, Clara Barton (Red Cross), Charles Dickens, Edgar Allan Poe, and Oliver Wendell Holmes were all believers.
  • Two US presidents, James Garfield and John Tyler, got readings. Mark Twain was a skeptic!

For business, it could no longer depend on reputation or word of mouth, so personality profiling was too useful not to be true. Rorschach test used thousands of time , the second most popular test among mental health professionals. It was created as a parlor game! Jeffrey Dahmer responses “were normal to the point of being mundane”

The Cult of Personality Testing

The Wall Street Journal wrote that Annie Murphy Paul “draws a veritable quacks’ gallery of modern personality testing. With an eye for the absurd, she makes a compelling case that such tests tell us more about the men and women who put them together than about the subjects taking them.”

Her book, The Cult of Personality Testing: How Personality Tests Are Leading Us to Miseducate Our Children, Mismanage Our Companies, and Misunderstand Ourselves (2004), is essential reading for understanding why these profiles are not at all effective.

Here a few of her more condemning facts:

  • [A]s many as three-quarters of test takers achieve a different personality type when tested again (47% by proponents!), and that the sixteen distinctive types described by the Myers-Briggs have no scientific basis whatsoever.
  • There is scant evidence that MBTI results are useful in determining managerial effectiveness, helping to build teams, providing career counseling, enhancing insight into self or others, or any other of the myriad uses for which it is promoted.

In 1968, Personality and Assessment was published, by Stanford University psychology professor Walter Mischel. He found the correlation between personality and behavior was .30. In other words, at best personality explained about 10% of behavior. Mischel believed that our actions are driven by situations, not personality.

The Life Story interview protocol, developed by Gordon Allport, is an alternative to sterile personality profiles.

Defined by Our Beliefs, not Our Knowledge or Personality

Professor Erkko Autio, department of management at HEC Lausanne in Lausanne, Switzerland, pointed out the same defects with respect to the current fad of “emotional intelligence” in a letter to The Economist:

It might interest you to know that not a single serious study has ever been able to demonstrate a link between “emotional intelligence” and leadership effectiveness. The most robust and consistent single predictor of leadership effectiveness is, simply, intelligence. Emotional intelligence sells well, but scientific evidence supporting it is almost as solid as that supporting the effectiveness of homeopathy (The Economist, Aug 26, 2006: 14).

Professor Autio is certainly correct in the assertion that intelligent quotient (IQ) is a better predictor of executive effectiveness, as The Bell Curve has scientifically demonstrated.  If you were confined to learning one number about an individual to predict their standard of living, you would be hard pressed to find a better one than their IQ.

However, firms are not confined to knowing just one thing about their human capital. As Rabbi Daniel Lapin wrote in Thou Shall Prosper: “You are best understood and appraised by others on the basis of the things you believe rather than on the basis of the things you know.

Or, we might add, rather than on the basis of your personality or year of birth (see Generational Astrology). [See Ron’s book review of Thou Shall Prosper, and his LinkedIn blog post on Generational Astrology].

We are better off understanding people’s beliefs if we want to even begin to understand how and why the Germans of the Third Reich could carry out their murderous orders in acquiescent servility, or the people who flew airplanes into buildings killing innocent civilians on September 11, 2001.

Trying to simplify the spirituality and soul of a human life by labeling it with a personality type (or even an IQ) is to disregard the uniqueness of individuals, which requires judgment and discernment far more than measurement.

As Peter Drucker once wrote, “There is no such thing as an infallible judge of people, at least not on this side of the Pearly Gates.” Chinese philosopher Lin Yutang, from his book, The Importance of Living:

To me…man’s dignity consists in the following facts which distinguish man from animals. First, that he has a playful curiosity and a natural genius for exploring knowledge; second, that he has dreams and a lofty idealism…third, and still more important, that he is able to correct his dreams by a sense of humor, and thus restrain his idealism by a more robust and healthy realism; and finally, that he does not react to surroundings mechanically and uniformly as animals do, but possesses the ability and the freedom to determine his own reactions and to change surroundings at his will. This last is the same as saying that human personality is the last thing to be reduced to mechanical laws; somehow the human mind is forever elusive, uncatchable and unpredictable, and manages to wriggle out of mechanistic laws or a materialistic dialectic that crazy psychologists and unmarried economists are trying to impose upon him. Man, therefore, is a curious, dreamy, humorous and wayward creature. In short, my faith in human dignity consists in the belief that man is the greatest scamp on earth.

Michael Novak, R.I.P.

Michael Novak was one of Ron’s all-time favorite authors. A former Democrat who converted to the right, and a profound defender of free market capitalism, in the pantheon with George Gilder, Rabbi Daniel Lapin, Father Robert Sirico, Milton Friedman, Deirdre McCloskey, among others.

Here is Father Robert Sirico’s video tribute to Novak:

George Weigel’s Tribute to Novak, and the Tribute by Joe Carter of Acton Institute.


Answers to Ed's Quiz

  1. Disc Profile

  2. Scorpio for February 2017

  3. Myers Briggs Profile

  4. Scorpio - About your sign

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #130 Preview: Personality Profiles: Helpful or Hokum

Companies use personality tests for a variety of purposes, such as employment screening, assessing leadership potential, fostering corroboration and teamwork, etc. The most widely used is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), created by Pennsylvania housewife Isabel Myers. This particular test is utilized by 89% of the Fortune 100, given to 2.5 million people each year to identify strengths and enhance teamwork. The Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI) was developed in 1946 to sort mental patients into diagnostic categories. It was then expanded in an attempt to describe normal people. Of course, popularity does not imply validity. What is worse, most companies keep these tests confidential so the data cannot be tested to determine effectiveness. These tests are also popular among consultants, who are paid good money to administer them in a convivial atmosphere. Helpful or hokum? We will attempt to answer in this week's show.

2 Comments

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #129: Memorable Mentors: Ludwig von Mises

Ludwig von Mises, economist, author, and one of the founders of the “neo-Austrian school” of economics.

Mises told his future wife: “If you want a rich man, don’t marry me. I am not interested in earning money. I am writing about money, but will never have much of my own.”

Our show was a discussion of the eBook, The Essential Ludwig von Mises, published by the Foundation for Economic Education, available for free.

Biography

At last, economics was whole, an integrated body of analysis grounded on individual action; there would have to be no split between money and relative prices, between micro and macro. –Murray Rothbard

Ludwig von Mises (1881-1973), born in Lemberg, 350 miles east of Vienna (today, part of Ukraine).

The oldest of three sons, from a prestigious Jewish family. His father was a construction engineer, who was titled “von” for his work on the Austrian railroads—similar to “sir” in Great Britain, but the title is inherited by all male, and unmarried female, descendants.

Carl Menger, one of the discoverers of the subjective theory of value

Carl Menger, one of the discoverers of the subjective theory of value

Mises entered University of Vienna turn of century, where he read Carl Menger, one of the creators of the subjective theory of value. In 1906, age 25, he graduated with a doctorate of laws, and became the chief economist at the Vienna Chamber of Commerce.

In 1912, published The Theory of Money and Credit, which challenged Irving Fisher’s quantity theory of money.

He finally got a teaching job, but only part time. He failed to be appointed for three reasons: 1) he was Jewish; 2) he was a staunch advocate of laissez-faire; and 3) he was personally dogmatic and intransigent. He was a private man, a confirmed bachelor for many decades, who finally married at age 57.

His younger brother, Richard, earned a PhD in mathematics, who became an aircraft designer. Mises always worried he’d be outdone by him.

Both brothers fought for Austria in the Great War, Mises being an artillery officer at the Eastern front who was decorated for bravery three times.

In 1934 he left Vienna to teach at the University of Geneva. In 1938, Nazis stormed Mises  Vienna apartment and confiscated his writings, 38 cases in call.

In the 1990s, Richard Ebeling of Hillsdale College discovered them stored in KGB files in Moscow, over 10,000 pages. What Irony! One of the foremost intellectual opponent of socialism in the 20th century, had his papers in the tender care of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union!

Ebeling has written Austrian Economics and Public Policy, among other works, which describe the contents of some of these papers. Mises personal library is located at Hillsdale College in Michigan

Mises emigrated to New York City in August 1940 (brother Richard was at Harvard). He never got a full-time teaching position, so his salary was subsidized by friends and foundations.

Brother Richard was a member of the  “Vienna Circle,” which included members such as Ludwig Wittgenstein and Karl Popper. They favored logical positivism, using empirical evidence to test theories.

Mises rejected this approach, preferring to rely on pure deductive reasoning instead.

Murray Rothbard once asked Mises what he thought of Richard’s book, Positivism: “I disagreed with that book, from the first sentence until the last.”

Peter Drucker, who knew Mises in his youth in Vienna and in New York, said of Mises: “He was the most depressing person I ever saw.” Murray

Rothbard disagreed, said Mises was a “joy and an inspiration.” Mises’ wife, Margit, said: “He wasn’t gentle. He had a will of iron, his mind a steel blade, and he could be unbelievably stubborn.

At a Mont Pelerin Society (founded by Friedrich Hayek in 1947) meeting in 1953 Milton Friedman chaired a session on income distribution. During the discussion, Mises stood up, announced “You’re all a bunch of socialists” and stomped out of room.

During his time at the Vienna Chamber of Commerce, he did support use of “limited trade retaliation” against countries that raised import taxes, to nudge them back to free trade.

In the early 1920s, Austria resorted to hyperinflation, like Germany. Hayek recalled his salary was 5,000 kronen/month in October 1921, then raised to 15,000/month in November and to 1 million/month by July 1922.

The League of Nations sent a commission to Vienna, along with some Austrian government officials, who paid a visit to Mises, asking for his advice on stopping the hyperinflation. “Meet me at 12:00 midnight at this building and I’ll tell you.”

“Hear that noise? Turn it off!” The Building was the government printing office. They did, and inflation ended.

Mises was Hayek’s teacher, and Eugen Bohm-Bawerk  was Mises’ teacher.

Mises and Hayek forecasted the Great Depression, Mises being the originator of the Austrian theory of money and business cycles. He thought unemployment was a pricing problem, not a demand-management problem, and felt Keynesian was nothing but special-interest group politicking. Hayek advanced Mises’ theory of business cycles, winning a Nobel Prize in 1974.

Mises died in New York City on October 10, 1973, age 92.

The Foundation for Economic Education ebook: The Essential Ludwig von Mises, contains five chapters, which we discussed.

1. Liberty and Property

A lecture to the 9th Meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society, October 1958

The Greeks and Romans thought freedom was only for the elite. Pre-capitalistic system was based on military conquest and opposed to innovation.

The characteristic feature of capitalism: principle of marketing, to satisfy the needs of the masses.

“If any of the socialists chiefs had tried to earn his living by selling hot dogs, he would have learned something about the sovereignty of the customers.”

“Government is a necessary institution, the means to make the social system of cooperation work smoothly…Government is not a necessary evil; it is not an evil, but a means, the only means available to make peaceful human coexistence possible. But it’s the opposite of liberty. It is beating, imprisoning, hanging.”

2. Profit and Loss

Mont Pelerin Society, September 1951

Bureaucratic management is the only alternative where there’s no profit and loss. Capital does not beget profit, as Marx thought.

It’s the entrepreneurial decision—mental acts, a product of the mind, a spiritual and intellectual phenomenon.

Lenin believed that production could be easily accomplished, since it consists of simple operations.

Taxing profit is tantamount to taxing success of those best at serving the public.

One main function profits: shift capital to those who best deploy it to satisfy the public.

Why is anyone better to expropriate than anyone else? Why shouldn’t immigrant’s wealth be taken by residents of their native country?

There is no third system: the choice is between capitalism and socialism.

3. Planned Chaos

Socialism, 1947.

Statoltry: combines idolatry with the state.

No such thing as a scientific ought. Science is only competent to establish what is.

Opponents of capitalism argue it hass no plan? Sure it has plans, just not that of the state, but those of individuals pursuing happinesss.

Capitalism vs. socialism: it’s not a fight over distribution, but which system best serves human welfare.

Marx never distinguished between communism and socialism, nor did Lenin who used socialist in the name of the USSR. In 1928, Stalin, at the  Communism International, made a distinction between the two words.

Ending: “What’s needed to stop the trend towards socialism and despotism is common sense and moral courage.”

4. Middle-of-the Road Policy Leads to Socialism

The so-called third way between capitalism and socialism is known asinterventionism, such as price controls, minimum wages, the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (part of FDR’s New Deal), etc.

Mises labeled this third way nothing but “socialism by installments.”

5. The Place of Economics in Learning

Human Action, 4th ed, 1949

Cancer research can help fight disease, but business cycle research cannot stop recessions or depressions.

Economics is abstract reasoning, it can never be experimental and empirical.

There’s no such thing as labor economics, agriculture economics, etc. The same is true of ethics. There’s only one coherent body of economics.

Present-day universities are by and large “nurseries of socialism.”

Economics too important to be left to specialists.

Mises’ Magnum Opus

Human Action, published in 1947, was the culmination of Mises work.

Human Action is to capitalists what Das Kapital is to Marxists.

What’s it about: “Everything!”

Economist Gary North has posited a “fat-book” theory: Producing a revolution requires a fat book. Examples:

  • Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations (1,097 pages)
  • Karl Marx, Das Kapital (2,846 pages)
  • Joseph Schumpeter (1,260 pages)
  • Murray Rothbard, Man, Economy and State (987 pages)
  • Milton Friedman, Monetary History of USA (860 pages)
  • Deirdre McCloskey, Bourgeois trilogy (2,000+ pages)
  • Mises, Human Action (907)
  • Baker, The Professionals Guide to Value Pricing

Mark Skousen says this is nothing but the Labor theory of value, since the Communist Manifesto was only 62 pages, and probably the second most influential book in history, next to the bible. The Four Gospels of the Bible are only 177 pages.

Mises built his system of economic though on logic and self-evident assumptions, similar to geometry. He rejected econometrics and mathematics in economics, believing there was no such thing as quantitative economics:

If a statistician determines that a rise of 10 per cent in the supply of potatoes in Atlantis at a definite time was followed by a fall of 8 per cent in the price, he does not establish anything about what happened or may happen with a change in the supply of potatoes in another country or at another time. He has not “measured” the “elasticity of demand” of potatoes. He has established a unique and individual historical fact.

Mises was a dualist who divided nature into two components:

  1. Human beings, who think, adopt values, make choices, and learn (social sciences)
  2. Animals and things, mechanical and predictable (physical sciences)

Revolutions to produce new words, and Mises introduced a few.

Praxeology is the study of human action. Then economics was the study of praxeology under conditions of scarcity. As Mises explained:

The field of our science is human action, not the psychological events which result in an action. It is precisely this which distinguishes the general theory of human action, praxeology, from psychology.

Catallactics is a theory of the way the free market system reaches exchange ratios and prices. It aims to analyze all actions based on monetary calculation and trace the formation of prices back to the point where an agent makes his or her choices. It explains prices as they are, rather than as they "should" be.

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #128: The Three—and only three—Pricing Strategies

In every market there are two kinds of fools. One charges too much, the other charges too little. Russian proverb.

There are only three pricing strategies: Skim, penetration and neutral.

Pricing is how we divide up value.

Tim Smith, author of Pricing Done Right, refers to these as price positioning. He believes pricing strategy includes things like segmentation, competitive reaction, and pricing capability.

Penetration Pricing

Price is the primary driver of the purchase decision with penetration pricing.

It can be effective and profitable, yet it is by far the least understood. After all, if your goal is to maximize market share, you could set your price at zero, or negative—pay customers to use it!

The literature is overwhelming: there are more failures than successes with this type of pricing.

It tends to attract the least loyal customers, who are thus the first to defect to a lower-priced offering.

Price cuts easy to match by the competition, then you get neither market share or profit.

Companies who appear to have implemented this strategy successfully:

  • Wal-Mart
  • Southwest Airlines (Ryanair in Europe is even more profitable)
  • Costco
  • Dell
  • IKEA
  • Timex
  • Freemium variation of Penetration

 One question with all these strategies is: your price compared to what?

  • Your offering’s value, or
  • Your competitors’ price

Reed Holden has changed his mind on this issue. In his prior book (written with Tom Nagle), The Strategy and Tactics of Pricing, he wrote that it was compared to your offering’s value.

Yet, in Pricing with Confidence, he writes it’s compared to your competitor’s price.

Success Factors with Penetration Pricing

  1. Begin with strategy from day one
  2. Operate extremely efficient, constantly driving costs out of the system and sharing those saving with customers
  3. Guarantee consistent quality
  4. Focus on core products/customers
  5. High-growth, high-revenue focus
  6. Procurement champions
  7. Little debt
  8. Control as much as possible (brands, value chain, etc.)
  9. Advertising focuses on price
  10. Never mix messages
  11. Understand your place (there’s room for only a tiny number of companies, in any industry, that can successfully deploy this pricing strategy)

As one pricing manager said: “In a war, the atomic bomb and price are subject to the same limitation: both can only be used once.”

Skim Pricing

If any of these strategies guaranteed success, everyone would do it. That said, skim pricing can be very profitable, as these companies that use it prove:

  • Apple
  • BMW
  • Bose
  • Disney
  • FedEx
  • Godiva
  • Gucci
  • Nordstrom

It’s not unusual for a premium priced product to have the highest market share. For example, P&G’s Gillette razor, at one point, had 70% of the market.

Success Factors with Skim Pricing

  • Superior value
  • Innovation
  • High quality
  • Branding, Marketing (vs. sales)
  • Shy on special offers

An excellent example of how dangerous this form of pricing can be because it invites competition is Xerox vs. Canon. Xerox never defended it’s higher position with a lower-priced flanking product.

Contrast Xerox with Apple, which is very adept at protecting it’s high-end value.

Beyond skim pricing is luxury whereby you take advantage of prestige, or so-called snob, effects. For instance, Switzerland is 2% of world’s watch production, yet it produces 53% of value.

The president of USA Porsche once said: “The second Porsche on the same street is a catastrophe.” It obviously focuses on profits, not market share, which might explain why, in 2013, it generated an18% profit margin, higher than any other auto company.

With skim, or even neutral, pricing, if you can offer a world-class guarantee, that can be a very effective strategy.

Such as the guarantee offered by Florida based “Bugs” Burger Bug Killers (BBBK)” exterminators:

  • Guaranteed to eliminate to rodents and roaches
  • If you or a guest see one, you get a refund of one year of our services
  • And we will pay another exterminator for one year
  • And to the guest who sees a roach: we will pay their bill, send a letter of apology, and invite them back as our quest

BBBK’s price is as high 10x its competitors.

Michael E. Raynor and Mumtaz Ahmed (both with Deloitte Consulting), in their April, 2013 Harvard Business Review article, “Three rules for making a company truly great,” April 11, 2013, wrote the three rules

  1. Better before cheaper—in other words, compete on differentiators other than price.
  2. Revenue before cost—that is, prioritize increasing revenue over reducing costs.
  3. There are no other rules—so change anything you must to follow Rules 1 and 2.

They also point out that very rarely is cost leadership a driver of superior profitability—Amazon is a good example.

Neutral Pricing

Tim Smith, in Pricing Done Right, says that neutral pricing is the default strategy, and generally the most profitable. It’s also least likely to trigger a price war. Successful examples:

  • Buick
  • Seiko watches
  • Sony
  • Toyota
  • Über
  • Zappos

Where the basis of competition and the purchase decision is focused on other attributes rather than price: service, features, guarantee, convenience, etc.

Good for no-growth, or slow-growth markets.

It can leave money on table, and it tends to signal average value.

Herman Simon, in his book, Confessions of the Pricing Man, cites a survey his firm conducted and found that managers spend 70% of their time focused on cost reduction; 20% on increasing volume; and only 10% on price. These percentages are the opposite of profit effects of these actions!

Choosing a Pricing Strategy

From Reed Holden’s Pricing with Confidence:

  • Understand your value, absolute and relative
  • Where’s your offering in the life cycle?
  • Industry economics (capacity, fixed vs. variable costs)
  • Competitive dynamics
  • Consensus (Ron says leadership, the opposite of consensus)

Life Cycle

  • Introduction
  • Growth
  • Maturity
  • Decline

You can use Skim and Neutral across the cycles, but penetration is not optimal during introduction/emerging, mature, or decline phases.

From Pricing with Confidence by Reed Holder and Mark Burton

From Pricing with Confidence by Reed Holder and Mark Burton

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #127 - Free-rider Friday - January 2017

Ed’s Topics

Calexit - A group started collecting signatures to hold a referendum on California's seceding from the United States. Ed's take is if Hillary Clinton had won, we would be talking Texit instead. 

Self-Deception - Ed recently attended a leadership workshop on self-deception held by John Engels of Leadership Coaching Inc. A primary source of self-deception is when we equate what is "true for me" with "the truth."  

Hitendra Patil article on AccountingWeb, Why Anxiety Around Automation is Absurd caught Ed's attention. It is an excellent piece but is missing the impact of the billable hour model on stalling the needed changes in the industry. 

Ed thinks his iPhone and Facebook were listening to a conversation we was having resulting in a ad for Five Guys Burgers showing up in his stream. He did some digging and found an article: which addresses this "phenomenon." - If you’re not paranoid, you’re crazy. 

According to a recent paper by Srikant Devaraj and Erik Nessen, "for $0.10 increase in real minimum wage, total hygiene violation score increases between 3.35 and 8.99 percent.” Is the minimum wage actually sickening?

In what is both an amazing scientific achievement and a source of ethical consideration, scientists announced that they can create human-pig embryos

Ron’s Topics

Hamilton—raise your price!

Battling bots,” The Economist, January 7, 2017

“When I was 25, having studied economics for 6 years, I grasped suddenly that prices are for allocation, not fairness. When I was 28, an assistant professor with Steve Cheung as an office mate, I grasped that prices are only one possible system of allocation (violence and queuing are others) but socially the cheapest." -Deirdre N. McCloskey, How to Be Human *Though an Economist

Deloitte Invests in Blockchain

Accounting Today, January 14, 2017, “Deloitte opens blockchain lab in New York

Google’s Business Model Threatened?

Still searching,” The Economist, December 17, 2016

Border Adjustability Tax

Trump wants to reduce the corporate tax rate from 35% to 15%; Paul Ryan wants 20%. Both want full expensing, and a  territorial system, where companies are taxed where they make the product, not on world-wide income as we do now.

But Republicans have proposed a border adjusted tax, whereby you are taxed at the consumption point, not the production point.

It’s very similar to a Value Added Tax, a sort of border-adjusted sales tax, or a cash flow consumption tax.

Corporations could not deduct the cost of imported goods, or interest expense.

Say Rolls-Royce exports a jet engine made in Britain to France: It pays a French VAT on the sale, and British tax on profit.

America currently imposes no VAT on imported goods.

So the border adjusted tax penalizes imports while subsidizing exports.

Boeing and GE love it! Wal-Mart and Target hate it! (the tax could exceed their profits, the cost being passed on to consumers).

Economists say, in theory, this wouldn’t affect trade since it would push up the dollar’s value. To offset a 20% border-adjusted tax, the dollar would need to rise by 25%.

This tax may violate WTO rules.

Steve Forbes writes it could cost consumers $1.2 trillion over 10 years, or more (since future Congresses could raise the rate easily).

Gain and pain,” The Economist, December 17, 2016

Steve Forbes, “OMG! House Republicans Are Preparing To Hit Consumers With A Horrible New Tax That Will Harm Trump And Hurt The Economy,” January 11, 2017.

Border Adjustability Is Already Fueling Tax Reform Controversy,” Forbes, December 8, 2016

Driverless Cars and Lidar

Eyes on the road,” The Economist, December 24, 2016

Trump’s Inauguration Speech

George Will wrote it was the worst inaugural speech in history.

It was short: 1433 words.

Fundamentally optimistic: “We must think big, and dream even bigger.”

He slammed the political class.

Jean-Claude Juncker, primer minister of Luxembourg: “We all know what to do; we just don’t know how to get re-elected after we’ve done it.”

1 Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #126: Reappraising the Performance Appraisal

On this episode, we explored the recent developments in companies that have moved away from the annual performance appraisal.

We originally explored this issue, including our suggested three replacements to the performance appraisal: Key Predictive Indicators, Drucker’s Manager’s Letter, and the After Action Review.

You can listen to our Episode #5: Replacing the Annual Performance Agony, from August, 2014. Also, the show notes contain the books we recommend and other resources.

In 2013, Ron wrote a two-part LinkedIn series on the annual performance appraisal, which was read over 382,000 times, garnering some 650 comments. Here are Part 1, and Part 2.

Some six percent of Fortune 500 companies have eliminated their rankings. Here is a list of companies that have also eliminated the annual performance appraisal:

  • Accenture (as of 9/1/15)
  • Adobe
  • The Gap
  • Deloitte
  • Medtronic
  • Ernst & Young
  • Buffer
  • Procter & Gamble (which hasn’t done annual appraisals in decades)

Accenture

In big move, Accenture will get rid of annual performance reviews and rankings, published in The Washington Post, Lillian Cunningham, July 21, 2015 detailed that Accenture had 330,000 team members around world and 95% managers were dissatisfied with the annual performance appraisal process, even though each manager was spending approximately 200 hours per year doing them.

The CEB (Mgmt Research Firm) found: 90% HR managers doubt accuracy of the information contained in appraisals.

Also, the CEB estimates: companies with 10,000 employees, on average, spend $35 million on annual performance appraisals.

Accenture is not eliminating them for cost savings, but rather to improve the future performance of its workers.

Buffer

We Don’t Have Performance Reviews at Our Startup: Here’s What We Do Instead, January 19, 2016, by Courtney Seiter, published on Buffer Open (company blog).

Rather than annual appraisals, Buffer does ongoing, weekly feedback: one-on-one between team leader and member, lasting approximately one hour.

The team member sets the agenda. It’s a mentor-mentee relationship.

Also, there are optional Masterminds, lasting 1-2 hours, which are peer-to-peer conversations.

Deloitte

Harvard Business Review, April 2015, Cover Story:

Reinventing Performance Management, Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall, Director of leader development.

Deloitte employs 65,000 people.

It was spending 2 million hours per year on annual performance appraisals, and 58% of its executives didn’t believe they drove engagement or high performance.

It eliminated cascading objectives, annual reviews, and 360-feedback.

The article cites research that assessing skills produces inconsistent data, and 62% of that variance are due to the rater’s peculiarities. Only 21% was related to actual performance.

3 Objectives of Deloitte’s New System

  • Recognize performance
  • See performance
  • Fuel future performance

The Team leader is in the best position to makes the assessment.

It asks the Team leader not about the skills of the team member, but rather their own future actions with respect to the team member.

Here are the four questions the team leader answers:

  1. Given what I know of this person’s performance, and if it were my money, I would award this person the highest possible compensation increase and bonus [1-5 scale, from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree”].
  2. Given what I know of this person’s performance, I would always want him or her on my team [same five-point scale].
  3. This person is at risk for low performance [yes-or-no basis].
  4. This person is ready for promotion today [yes-no-basis].

One problem we discussed with this approach is the economist’s notion of revealed preference: watch what people do, not what they say. This can seriously distort surveys such as this.

In any event, this data is the starting point, not the end point, for compensation at Deloitte.

Of course, it still mentions performance metrics: hours and sales.

It does at least quarterly, or per-project, snapshots, and a weekly check-in with team leader.

Sports teams have a plethora of data on each player, while doctors have pages of blood work numbers.

But Deloitte found that having only one number was the problem.

Better understanding comes from conversations, not data.

McKinsey & Company Article

Ahead of the curve: the future of performance management,” May 2016, Boris Ewenstein, Bryan Hancock, and Asmus Komm.

An excellent article exploring the disadvantages of the annual performance appraisal process.

Other Resources

The Knowledge Matrix

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #125: Memorable Mentors — Frédéric Bastiat

This week, Ron and Ed profiled Frédéric Bastiat, a French economist and author who was a prominent member of the French Liberal School. He introduced the Parable of the Broken Window. He was also a Freemason, and member of the French National Assembly.

As a strong advocate of classical liberalism and the economics of Adam Smith, his views favoring free trade and opposing protectionism provided a basis for libertarian capitalism and the Austrian School.

The focus of our conversation will be around the works published in the free eBook entitled, The Essential Bastiat, published by the Foundation for Economic Education. Click on the link to get your copy. 

Frédéric Bastiat was the most brilliant economic journalist who ever lived.” –Joseph Schumpeter (1954)

Bastiat was an indefatigable advocate free trade, laissez-faire policies, unrelenting debater and statesman. He’s often compared to Voltaire and Benjamin Franklin, integrity, purity, and elegance.

He was unrivaled in exposing fallacies, using reductio ad absurdum.

He attacked statism of all kinds—socialism, communism, utopianism, and mercantilism, labor theory of value, exploitation theories.

Biography

Born June 29, 1801 in Bayonne, the south of France and tragically died young on December 24, 1850. He had poor health and weak lungs his whole life.

Son of a landowner and merchant in Spanish trade. His mother died when he was seven, father when he was nine, raised by his aunt and grandfather. Strong believer in the Catholic faith.

Heavily influenced by Jean-Baptise Say and Adam Smith.

In 1846, he moved to Paris, writing on free trade and in 1848 the peasants in France rebelled against the French monarchy, and their rallying cry was socialism.

Bastiat wrote of the rebellion: “We have tried so many things; when shall we try the simplest of all: freedom?”

He elected to the National Assembly in 1848, and was vice president of the finance committee. He sat on the left side, where the liberals and radicals sat.

Henry Hazlitt (1894-1993), author of Economics in One Lesson, 1946, has often been called a modern-day Bastiat. We will profile Hazlitt in a future Memorable Mentors show.

In 1843 Karl Marx moved to Paris to become editor of a monthly German magazine. He met Friedrich Engels in Paris, who became his life long collaborator.

Marx labeled Bastiat: the most “superficial apologist of the vulgar economy.”

We discussed the five essays included in the free FEE book, mentioned in the introduction above. Here are some excerpts.

The Youth of France

  • Are men’s interests, when left to themselves, harmonious or antagonistic?
  • Socialists love for society they dreamed up; actual society cannot be destroyed soon enough.
  • Socialism, like astrology and alchemy, proceeds by way of imagination.
  • Political economy, like astronomy and chemistry, proceeds by way of observation.
  • Deny evil! Deny pain! Who could? We are talking about mankind.
  • For the laws of Providence to be harmonious, it’s not necessary they exclude evil.
  • Since man is free, he can choose; since he can choose, he can err;   since he can err, he can suffer.
  • What are the things men have right to impose upon another by force? I know of only one, and that’s justice.

What Is Seen and What Is Not Seen

  • The difference between good and bad economist, whole difference: the bad one takes account of the visible effect; the good takes account both of the effects which are seen, and also those which are necessary to foresee.
  • It almost always happens when immediate consequence is favorable, the ultimate consequences are fatal, and the converse.
  • We learn this lesson from two masters: experience and foresight. Experience teaches effectually, but brutally.

The Parable of the Broken Window

  • Society loses the value of things which are uselessly destroyed.
  • How much trade would gain by the burning of Paris?
  • If the nation profits from the Army, then we should enroll the entire male population.

If we disapprove of State support, we are supposed to disapprove of the thing itself, like the arts, education, health, environment, public works, etc.

Section VIII. Machinery

  • A curse on machines, is to curse the spirit of humanity!
  • If true, there is no activity, prosperity, wealth, or happiness possible for any people, except those who are stupid and inert, and to whom God has not granted the fatal gift of knowing how to think, to combine, invent.
  • All men seek to obtain the greatest amount of gratification with the smallest possible amount of labor.
  • If a machine discharges a workman: the seen is there’s an unemployed worker but there’s also a capitalist with an unemployed franc.
  • What is saved by one, profits all.

A Petition

Probably Bastiat’s most famous writing: “A Petition: From the Manufacturers of Candles, Tapers, Lanterns, sticks, Street Lamps, Snuffers, and Extinguishers, and from Producers of Tallow, Oil, Resin, Alcohol, and Generally of Everything Connected with Lighting.”

We are suffering from unfair competition at a fantastically low price: the sun.

Please pass a law ordering the closing of all windows, skylights, shutters, curtains, and blinds.

A Negative Railroad

Should there be a break in the tracks at Bordeaux on hte railroad from Paris to Spain? It would be profitable for boatmen, porters, hotels, taverns, etc.

Then we shall end by having a railroad composed of a whole series of breaks in the tracks, i.e., a negative railroad.

The Law

Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws. On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place.

Law has been perverted by the influence of two different causes: stupid greed and false philanthropy.

Labor is pain, so history shows man will resort to plunder.

Look at the USA [1850]. There’s no country in the world where the law is kept more within its proper domain: the protection of every person’s liberty and property.

But, there are two issues that have always endangered the public peace.

Slavery is a violation, by law, of liberty. Tariff, by law, of property.

Socialists rely on the law; they practice legal plunder, not illegal plunder.

Other Bastiat Wit

If exports are good, and imports are bad, then we should sink the ships at sea.

The Right Hand and the Left (a Report to the King). This is one of Ron’s favorite of Bastiat, and we believe it applies to hourly billing (see Ron’s article from a Harcourt Brace Newsletter, from October 1997, posted on the VeraSage site). Here is the crux of the argument.

Deep study of the protectionist system has revealed to us this syllogism:

  • The more one works, the richer one is.
  • The more difficulties one has to overcome, the more one works.
  • Ergo, the more difficulties one has to overcome, the richer one is.
  • We propose that you forbid your loyal subjects to use their right hands.

No longer permissible to work except with the foot. As a last resort, we should take recourse to the limitless possibilities of amputation.

George Orwell wrote, “Each joke is a tiny revolution.”

Bastiat killed protectionism and socialism with ridicule.

Consumption is the end of all economic activity, production merely the means.

To sacrifice the consumer’s interest to that of the producer is the sacrifice of the end to the means. The interest of the consumer is identical to mankind.

People insist, it’s not enough to tear down; you must offer something constructive. I, for my part, think that to tear down an error is to build up the truth that stands opposed to it.

No solitary man would break his own tools to occupy his labor.

To maintain that the time will every come when human labor will lack employment, it would be necessary to prove that mankind will cease to encounter obstacles.

Only two ways to preserve life: production or plunder.

Other resources

  • Bastiat published two major works: Economic Harmonies and The Law, a pamphlet June 1850.
  • Also, Economic Sophisms, is an excellent compilation of some of Bastiat’s writings, with an Introduction by Henry Hazlitt.
  • Southwest Ad that ran after Wright Amendment repealed

Libertas book, The Tuttle Twins Learn About the Law

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #124: Interview with Gary and Jim Boomer

We were thrilled to interview Gary and Jim Boomer, the father/son team at the head of Boomer Consulting. Both are recognized as among the most influential people in the accounting profession.

Biographies

L. Gary Boomer is the Visionary & Strategist of Boomer Consulting, Inc., an organization that provides consulting services and peer communities to leading accounting firms. BCI's vision is to make you more successful and future ready. The areas of focus are: Planning, People and Processes with technology as the accelerator.

Jim Boomer is the CEO at Boomer Consulting, Inc.  He is a;so the director of the Boomer Technology Circles, The Producer Circle, The CIO Advantage and an expert on managing technology within an accounting firm.  He also serves as a strategic planning and technology consultant and firm adviser to CPA firms across the country.

Segment One Questions

Gary, how many years in a row have you made the Top 100 Most Influential People in Accounting list? (Gary: “It’s based on frequent flyer miles.”).

Tell us about your backgrounds?

Jim, you worked at Arthur Andersen. What was it like, during the Enron scandal, to think you were part of a firm with ethical lapses, especially from a leadership perspective?

Gary, you say the difference between the good and great firms is leadership. What does that mean to you?

Why aren’t CPA firms as focused as, say, Apple?

Segment Two Questions

Joe Woodard refers to Gary as the “pied piper of the top 100 firms.” What do you both think are the major trends, along with biggest challenges and opportunities facing the accounting profession?

Do you see a bold enough vision coming from CPA firm leaders? They love to talk about increasing realization by 4%, but is the vision inspiring?

We’ve been hearing for decades about how important it is for the CPA profession to move from compliance to advisory services. Do you see a lot of movement in advisory services within the larger firms?

If it’s about skill-set, tool-set and mind-set, will firms have to expand the labor pool from which they draw, and not just hire people with technical accounting education?

When you look at Top 100 firms’ revenue that comes from consulting, it’s usually higher than for the firms below the Top 100. Would you agree with that?

Segment Three Questions

What are the implications of Blockchain, triple entry accounting, and Bitcoin for the accounting profession?

With Amazon’s Echo (“Alexa”), can you see a day where someone could ask, “Hey, Alexa, what’s the name of the nearest CPA firm that can handle X?” Or even, Alexa answering a question that normally would be asked of the CPA?

Segment Four Questions

In specific firms, there are a lot of initiatives—from reforming annual performance appraisals, adopting knowledge management, cloud accounting, value pricing, etc.—that require change management. Do you see much innovation in management philosophy among the large firms?

What’s going on with Value Pricing within the Top 100 firms? Is the leadership really ready to embrace it?

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.

Episode #123: 2016: Year in Review

Segment One

Ron and Ed discussed memorable guests and show topics they had on during 2016.

It’s nearly impossible to choose favorite guests, since they are all good! But we asked each other, so here are our choices for 2016, which encompass shows #74 through #122, including the link to the archived show:

Ron’s Choices

Ed’s Choices

  • Daniel Susskind, (#74)— because of the chain reaction his book kicked off, The Future of the Professions.
  • Mark Koziel, (#75), VP of Firm Services & Global Alliances at the AICPA, with his reaction to the Susskind’s book, and the state of the accounting profession.
  • Paul Kennedy, VeraSage Institute colleague, told his compelling OBK story (#84).
  • Rabbi Lapin (#86), our first two-time guest returned in 2016.
  • Doug Sleeter, (#96) + (#99), for being Bitcoin and Blockchain obsessed.
  • Gregory LaFollette, (#104), for his views on technology and the future of the accounting profession.
  • We also did our #100th show.

Favorite Show Topics

Ron: Trashing the Timesheet, #109

Ed: A Check for Everyone? The Basic Income Idea, (#95)

Thank You to Our Audience!

Thank you, thank you, thank you, to our Audience! You are the reason we are here, and we will strive to continue to add value by bringing you leading edge guests and ideas.

Our Latest iTunes Review

LizCPAWriter on December 19, 2016 writes: Always Though Provoking - I Always learn something new on this podcast. Ron and Ed bring in fascinating guests with interesting points of view. Yes, they are opinionated, but they are firmly committed to the survival of accounting and business advisory work as viable careers. The world is changing and so must we if we are to continue providing value.”

Thank you, Liz.

Click here to leave your own review.

Segment Two: Favorite Books from 2016

Ed’s selections

Ron’s selections

Ron’s Best Book of 2016

The Kingdom of Speech, Tom Wolfe. Here’s some thought-provoking excerpts:

The Kingdom of Speech
$13.00
By Tom Wolfe
  • “The most fundamental questions about the origins and evolution of our linguistic capacity remain as mysterious as ever”
  • “Speech is not one of man’s several unique attributes—speech is the attribute of all attributes!”
  • “One hundred and fifty years since the Theory of Evolution was announced, and they had learned…nothing…in that same century and a half, Einstein discovered the speed of light and the relativity of speed, time, and distance…Pasteur discovered that microorganisms, DNA, 150 years’ worth of linguists, biologists, anthropologists, discovered…nothing…about language.”
  • “Darwin had an even bigger problem: a huge gap in evidence when it came to language, which set humans far apart from any animal ancestors.”
  • “He couldn’t find one shred of solid evidence that human speech had evolved from animals…seemed to have just popped up into the mouths of human beings from out of nowhere.”
  • “Darwin had fallen into the trap of cosmogonism—the             compulsion to find the ever-elusive Theory of Everything…”

Ed mentioned research being done on evolution and consciousness, video interview with Donald Hoffman

Insert video interview with Donald Hoffman

Also, a speech by George Gilder at the 25th anniversary of the founding of the Discovery Institute: “Leap Before You Look: Reflections on the Mission and “Evolution” of Discovery Institute,” from December 2, 2016.

Segment Three: R.I.P.

  • First Lady Nancy Reagan
  • John Glenn
  • Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, from Monroeville, Alabama
  • Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia
  • Thomas Hayden, 60s radical and former husband of Jane Fonda
  • Janet Reno
  • Arnold Palmer
  • Boxing champ Muhammad Ali
  • Florence Henderson
  • Robert Vaughn
  • Doris Roberts
  • Gene Wilder
  • Patty Duke
  • Abe Vigoda
  • Carrie Fisher
  • Debbie Reynolds
  • Garry Shandling , he was 66 (not in his 50s as Ron said)
  • George Michaels
  • David Bowie
  • Prince
  • Merle Haggard
  • Songwriters Leonard Cohen and Leon Russell

Article by economist Steven Horwitz predicting that we will see an acceleration of death of famous people, as the Baby Boom generation starts to age.

Special Mentions

Ed’s mentor’s mentor: Steven Geske is “Walking on.” We had Howard Hansen (Ed’s mentor) and Steven Geske on show (#11). They are the authors of a great book, Healing Leadership.

Fidel Castro, whose funeral car had to be pushed. There were some great Tweets about this, such as, “Even Hell is rejecting him,” and “Who says the embargo didn’t work.”

Ron mentioned a quote from the Talmud, but got it backwards. It is actually a celebration of those who have passed. Here it is:

In a harbor, two ships sailed: one setting forth on a voyage, the other coming home to port. Everyone cheered the ship going out, but the ship sailing in was scarcely noticed. To this, a wise man said: “Do not rejoice over a ship setting out to sea, for you cannot know what terrible storms it may encounter and what fearful dangers it may have to endure. Rejoice rather over the ship that has safely reached port and brings its passengers home in peace.
And this is the way of the world: When a child is born, all rejoice; when someone dies, all weep. We should do the opposite. For no one can tell what trials and travails await a newborn child, but when a mortal dies in peace, we should rejoice, for he has completed a long journey, and there is no greater boon than to leave this world with the imperishable crown of a good name.
–The Talmud

Segment Four: Miscellaneous

Ron’s topic

Hat tip to John Chisholm (our VeraSage colleague) and listener Bryce for passing along this excellent article from December 21, 2016, in The Guardian: “Why time management is ruining our lives,” by Oliver Burkeman.

Here are some interesting tidbits from the article, which we highly recommend:

  • Merlin Mann of “Inbox Zero” fame, which the New Yorker said was “halfway between Scientology and Zen,’ while the NY Post called it “Bullshit,” is discussed.
  • The better you get at time management, the less time you feel you have.
  • The article lays waste to Frederick Taylor, the founder of “Scientific Management,” which was also the theme of our very first show on The Soul of Enterprise.
  • Creativity requires more slack, says Tom DeMarco.
  • Time management and efficiency is really nothing more than the fear of death: to die with the sense of nothing left undone: it’s nothing less than the promise of immortality by other means.
  • But a gift of being alive is never to be done.

Ed’s topic

The new Star Wars movie, Rogue One, has a controversy. Peter Cushing has been dead since 1994, but another actor plays him, with Cushing’s face CGI’d on him, so who gets the royalty?

 

Comment

Ed Kless

Ed Kless joined Sage in July of 2003 and is currently the senior director of partner development and strategy. He develops and delivers curriculum for Sage business partners on the art and practice of small business consulting. Courses include: Sage Consulting Academy, Business Strategy and Customer Experience Workshops. Ed is the author of The Soul of Enterprise: Dialogues on Business in the Knowledge Economy, a compendium of a few of the episodes of his VoiceAmerica talk-show The Soul of Enterprise: Business in the Knowledge Economy with Ron Baker, founder of the VeraSage Institute where Ed is also a senior fellow.